09 July 2012

Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge: Challenge #2 --- Rhyme Time

Today’s OLJ Poetry Form challenge is continuing the “warm-up phase” with another fairly simple and open prompt. If you missed the first challenge, you can get caught up here. For guidelines, check out this post.

The OLJ Poetry Form Challenge #2: Rhyme Time

Sometimes it feels like the journey of poetry is very similar to a life’s journey --- you begin an infant, grow, develop, and mature, and in many symbolic representations “return” to “infancy” at death. That’s a vast oversimplification of life, but a similar morphology could apply to some poets (including myself) and our view of rhyme. When we start out, many of us think every poem needs to rhyme: Roses are red, violets are blue, if you are a poem, then rhyme is for you! As we develop our own unique voices, we pull away from rhyme. Suddenly it becomes an infantile way of writing. I’ve started to shift back toward an appreciation of “graceful” rhyme, though I’m still a little wary sometimes. Many poets will never go back to rhyme, at least not intentionally, and may miss some of the beautiful linguistic sounds and motions a poem can engage when rhyme remains part of the picture.

Defining it

A basic definition of rhyme is pretty self-explanatory: it is the repetition of similar sounds in two or more words. But the way rhyme is used in poetry varies. I, for instance, knew that there is “perfect rhyme” (i.e., “hat” and “cat”), but I don’t think I was ever told until recently that there are three distinct types of perfect rhyme (masculine, feminine, and dactylic). There are slant and general rhymes. Assonance, consonance, and alliteration are all technically forms of rhyme.

Rhymes can also appear at different places in a poem. An end rhyme exists when the words or syllables at the end of a line rhyme (i.e. “There was an old man from Nantucket / Who carried a big yellow bucket”). There is also internal rhyme, when rhyme appears within a single line (the first example that came to mind is Adele’s lyric, “Never mind I’ll find someone like you…”)

A rhyme scheme is the development of a pattern of rhyme in lines of poetry. Probably the most common is a simple ABAB or ABBA rhyme. For more on rhyme schemes, check out this great resource: Rhyming Schemes (YouTube video).

Doing it

For this challenge, all you have to do is experiment with rhyme. Write at least two poems (you only have to share one) in which you play with a defined (by you) rhyme scheme. Once you’ve played a bit and gotten comfortable with it, start to expand your rhyme skills and work with various types of rhyme within your poem, such as: end rhyme, internal rhyme, alliteration, slant rhyme, sight rhyme (which are not technically rhymes but add surprise to a poem with the suggested rhyme that doesn’t actually exist, i.e. “cough” and “bough”), and so forth. For more types and varieties of rhyme to play with, visit Alberto Rios' "Glossary of Rhymes."

Fun it up!

Don’t forget to share your attempts in the comments below or email them to ourlostjungle@kharahouse.com. If you want to be considered for the Friday feature, make sure you have your submissions in by Thursday at 10pm!

Good luck!



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Catch up with the Challenge:

8 comments:

  1. Ended up with an unexpectedly distressing one. :P But... at least it rhymes?
    A Man is Screaming in Sheridan Square

    ReplyDelete
  2. I combined mine with Poetic Bloomings prompt to write a Skeltonic but I don't know how to do what Joseph did to link the poem. Is that just cutting and pasting?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can just copy and paste the link here if you'd like :)

      Delete
  3. Can't get my mind to settle in. And it shows
    http://briarcat.wordpress.com/2012/07/11/rhym-ish-foolishness/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Bop Bop Bebop

    Bird and Dizzy played
    a sound that caused a tizzy.
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    The name came from scat.
    Diddily Diddily Dat
    Bop Bop Bebop bop

    Harmony was key.
    Stayed true to the melody.
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    The lines became long
    in the songs and at the doors.
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    When swing had swung, it
    was the new sound that had won.
    Bop Bebop Oh,yeah

    ReplyDelete
  5. Bop Bop Bebop

    Bird and Dizzy played
    a sound that caused a tizzy.
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    The name came from scat.
    Diddily Diddily Dat
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    Harmony was key.
    Stayed true to the melody.
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    The lines became long
    in the songs and at the doors.
    Bop Bop Bebop Bop

    When swing had swung, it
    was the new sound that had won.
    Bop Bebop Oh, Yeah

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This was a lot of fun, Michelle--I love the scat rhythm! Thanks for sharing :) I look forward to reading more!

      Delete
  6. Thanks, Khara. It was fun to write. Sorry it posted twice.

    ReplyDelete

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