30 July 2012

Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge: Challenge #5 --- Sonnet

Good morning, poets, and welcome to the fifth week of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge! In case you haven’t noticed, our forms have been getting a little longer each week at this point, and including more elements that we’ve worked with from week one onward. This week, we will engage with everything we’ve done so far, from rhyme scheme to meter, to play with a form fit for a Queen.

The OLJ Poetry Form Challenge #5: Sonnet

27 July 2012

the our lost jungle poetry form challenge: challenge #4 results

Good morning, all! Today marks two endings ... First, on a personal note, I am packing up my summer girls and sending them back home to their families. I haven't had much chance (or, more properly, any chance) to write about the experience of working with them, but let me sum it up in one word: amazing. (Actually, let me use six words: mostly amazing, but also extremely stressful!)

More importantly for all of you, though, is the fact that today marks the end of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge #4! (For challenge guidelines, visit here; to get caught up, check the links at the end of this post!)

23 July 2012

Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge: Challenge #4 --- Lento

Welcome to the fourth week of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge! First, another congratulation to the five featured poets from last week’s haiku challenge. This week, we’re moving on to a longer form, and (as promised last week) reintroducing rhyme schemes.

The OLJ Poetry Form Challenge #4: Lento

This week we'll be working with a form known as the "lento." When I first heard about the lento form, I thought it was no big deal; two quatrains (4-line stanzas) with “a traditional rhyme scheme” sounded fairly easy. But, as it turned out, there’s a bit more to it than that.

20 July 2012

the our lost jungle poetry form challenge: challenge #3 results

Happy Friday, poets! Today marks the end of the third week of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge, and the end of challenge number three. This was probably the hardest challenge week of results to pick from; you all did a fantastic job.

16 July 2012

Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge: Challenge #3 --- Haiku

Welcome to week three of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge. So far we’ve played with poetic meter and rhyme … now it’s time to get down to the real grunt work of this challenge and jump into some actual forms of poetry.

The OLJ Poetry Form Challenge #3: Haiku

To be totally honest with you, haiku has never been one of my favorite forms of poetry. When I was younger and in elementary school we would be assigned the rigid “5-7-5” haiku and I balked because the translated Japanese haiku we read were never 5-7-5 --- those syllables lost in translation seemed entirely unfair to my young mind. As I got older, I grew to the same traditionalized argument that a haiku has to have 5-7-5 syllables. When in doubt, I would count, and demand corrections. Even now I find myself a whiny haiku writer, demanding more frequently than I should that everyone should write based on the short-longer-short rule of haiku. (I won’t even go into what happened when I heard the “rules” about nature, seasonal references, sensory images, and actions.)

13 July 2012

the our lost jungle poetry form challenge: challenge #2 results

Good morning, all! Today ends the second week of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge! I was just as excited this week as I was last week with the results--it was so hard to choose just one poem to feature. Congratulations to all who made an attempt; your work was lovely.

09 July 2012

Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge: Challenge #2 --- Rhyme Time

Today’s OLJ Poetry Form challenge is continuing the “warm-up phase” with another fairly simple and open prompt. If you missed the first challenge, you can get caught up here. For guidelines, check out this post.

The OLJ Poetry Form Challenge #2: Rhyme Time

Sometimes it feels like the journey of poetry is very similar to a life’s journey --- you begin an infant, grow, develop, and mature, and in many symbolic representations “return” to “infancy” at death. That’s a vast oversimplification of life, but a similar morphology could apply to some poets (including myself) and our view of rhyme. When we start out, many of us think every poem needs to rhyme: Roses are red, violets are blue, if you are a poem, then rhyme is for you! As we develop our own unique voices, we pull away from rhyme. Suddenly it becomes an infantile way of writing. I’ve started to shift back toward an appreciation of “graceful” rhyme, though I’m still a little wary sometimes. Many poets will never go back to rhyme, at least not intentionally, and may miss some of the beautiful linguistic sounds and motions a poem can engage when rhyme remains part of the picture.

06 July 2012

the our lost jungle poetry form challenge: challenge #1 results

Good morning, all! Today ends the first week of the Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge! My hopes for the course of this challenge are high after reading through the submissions I received this week ... and I very much enjoyed the cross-web journey I was taken on in reading them (from the comments on this blog to external web pages to email)!

02 July 2012

Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge: Challenge #1 --- Meter

Welcome to the first challenge of the OLJ Poetry Form Challenge! We’re going to start slow and keep building momentum through the months of July and August. Good luck! (For guidelines, check out this post)

The OLJ Poetry Form Challenge #1: Meter

In high school and undergrad, I remember being exceptionally frustrated with poetic meter. I remember wondering what the point was. Why were syllable counts and beats so stinking important in poems?! It wasn’t until I heard a professor read a poem beat by beat, syllable by syllable, that I started to hear the subtle shifts in sound and momentum that meter allows.

the our lost jungle poetry form challenge!!!

As poets, many of us (myself included) spend a lot of time writing poetry in our own styles ... But not a whole lot of time with the "classic" forms from which our poems are descendant. Growing up, my parents and grandparents often used the phrase, “Know where you came from.” With that concept in mind, I am excited to engage with you, for the next two months, in a Poetry Form Challenge.

The Our Lost Jungle Poetry Form Challenge!

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